Antique Treasure Found by 31 Club Member

Monday, November 26, 2007

I got a call about half way through the day from Cecil C. I am sure that you’ve heard me talk about him before. He is the one that I wrote about in the book 31 Steps to Your Million in Antiques and Collectibles. Remember the Kentucky Derby Glass that he bought for $12.00 and sold two weeks later for $12,500.00? This is my friend that never ceases to amaze me.

He asked if I was near my computer, and of course, I always am. He asked if I would go to AskArt.com and tell him what I could about an artist named Wallace Weir Fahnestock. Naturally I did.

I soon shared the information that Mr. Fahnestock was born in Pennsylvania but did most of his best painting in Vermont. His birth was in 1877 and he died about 1962. I hesitated and waited for him to tell me more about his great purchase, but instead he asked me to continue.

“The highest auction price for one of his paintings was November of last year,” I said, “and it brought $5,700. So what have you found, Cecil?”

“Well,” he said “I did find this wonderful winter scene with two little rabbits in it, about 20″ bt 24″. What do you think it’s worth?”

“Are you going to tell me what you paid for it, Cecil? I know you already bought it.”

“Ah, give me my momentary pleasure,” he toyed. “So what’s it worth?”

Well, I knew I should just give him the information. I was just feeling a little outdone by my own student. In fact, we’d even partnered on paintings in the past. I knew he didn’t pay much, but I found myself wanting to know just a wee bit more than him at that moment. I put that all aside and told him, “Good job, Cecil. Looks like it’s worth from $8,000-$10,000. Now, what’d you pay for it?”

“Only $800. So it looks like I did okay, don’t you think?”

I knew at that moment, he was one of my finest students. “Well done, Cecil.”

How does Cecil do this so consistently? He studies and he gets out there. He’s developed an eye for high quality work.You can do the very same thing, because it is this commitment that gets the job done.

For those that say there are no more treasures to be found, I say they must not know Cecil. I am still looking forward to the near future when I will be saying the same thing about you.

About the time I was going to really give him the praise he rightly deserved, he said to me, “Can I ask you about something else?” What else does he have up his sleeve today, I thought.

“I might have found a really good piece of Carnival Glass. Do you have your Carnival Glass Book,” he asked?

A Grape and Cable 9 inch plate in amethyst with the electric blue iridescent highlights that books for $500.00 to $800.00 was what Cecil found. It was hard for me to ask what he paid, but I did. “Sixty dollars, and it is in mint condition.”

Now, I would call that a great day by anyone’s standards. Boy, do I enjoy writing these stories. I am hoping that in a few months I will have to get a new key board for my computer because I will have worn this one out telling the world about the great treasures the 31 Club Members are finding.

Today’s photo is an example of a Wallace Weir Fahnestock painting, courtesy of Askart.com
Be sure to visit our web site for more information about how you can join the 31 Club Wealth Building and start your own race to your millions! Read more about it here!”The Guy in the Red Tie” — Daryle Lambert

If you haven’t yet had a chance to see what we’ve got listed in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace, click on over and take a look. You might even find a real bargain. We’ve got many high quality items priced reasonably. If you have a high quality piece you’d like us to find a buyer for, why not consign your piece to us. No high fees when you sell with us. Just contact us here.

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One Response

  1. The painting is really beautiful. Getting such pieces of art at a reasonable price is challenging. Carnival Glass collectibles come in attractive and rare colors and a variety of styles.

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