It’s a What? A Whirligig?

If I told you a whirligig could bring in some big money, would you know what a whirligig is and how to spot one?

I always teach that the money in this business is made in the rare. The rare and desirable will keep your money turning, and a whirligig falls into this category.

So what is a whirligig? Think motion. Think action. Then, consider our past as a farming culture. When we were mainly farmers, birds in the fields, pecking away at crops was a real problem. Farmers needed something to scare off the birds without having to constantly have someone on the lookout who could to run out into the fields and wildly flap their arms to get rid them. Enter the whirligig. It’s a type of interesting and creative folk contraption made by a farmer on his time off from the fields, to solve the bird problem. Many will call it a toy, because it brought much delight to children, as well as to adults, but this contraption was designed with a purpose.

Most of these interesting contraptions are made of wood, but they can be made of almost any material. They have moving pieces, and when the wind blows on them, it creates an action. They might remind you of windmills — folksy windmills.

I have seen figural whirligigs whose arms spin and the head moves. These are rather simple, but there are others depicting a person sawing a log or a woman churning butter. With these, you are beginning to touch upon the higher dollar whirligigs. They weren’t actually meant to scare off the birds, but rather to enjoy. These are the ones whose dollar value has escalated so much. The number of these pieces that have survived till now is limited. To the avid collector of these artistic creations, the hunt for them is a labor of love.

Unlike items like duck decoys, whose value escalates when it is signed by a particular artist, whirligigs don’t have to be signed for them to be valuable; the value is in the design.

Here is an example of some whirligig values: Two men turning a fan, articulated limbs, 13X18 inches, valued at $690. 20th Century 12” man wearing black jacket and blue trousers,$1380. Policeman, one arm and band leader the other arm, 20 inches, wooden, $3300. And, a man wearing a pealed hat, blue jacket, and red vest, 21 inches, $6325.

While there are reproductions, a close look will tell you the differences. Look for signs of new paint, modern screws, no patina, poor workmanship and materials not of the time.

There are so many items that have the potential to bring big money, but first we have to know what to look for. If you come across one of these during your hunt, I hope this blog will come to mind. And, if you’re successful in buying it, you might just keep a whirligig for a while before selling it just to amuse yourself.

Today’s Photo comes from Marquisauctions.com.

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Libbey Glass: Not Only Kentucky Derby Glasses

Not Only Derby Glasses: Libbey Cut Glass


Libbey Bowl in the Ellsmere pattern recently sold on eBay for $615.

Because I and others have written about the value of Libbey Glass Company’s Kentucky Derby Glasses, a lot people may have their radar raised at the present time on these valuable treasures. However, this fine company produced a wide range of products, and some pieces can be quite valuable as well.

I seriously doubt that many people are looking for Libbey vases or bowls. These cut glass items can command prices in the thousands. For example a 20” vase made in the Harvard pattern, Amethyst cut to clear can bring $3400. A signed Amberina Perfume Bottle might fetch $2450. With these prices, it might be wise to become familiar with this company’s higher end items.

Libbey Glass Company started in 1888 in Toledo Ohio and was later purchased by Owens-Illinois in 1935. It is still in production today and makes a very wide range of products.

You may have already figured this out, but the older pieces will usually bring the most money. I am one of the people guilty of passing by cut glass pieces because I think there will be damage on them, which there usually is. Another reason for me passing these by is due to the number of new or fake pieces I run across. But, I’ve discovered that it would be well worth my while to set my assumptions aside, slow down, and spend more time looking very closely when I come face to face with cut glass items at sales. I encourage you to do the same.

Most people will not be able to distinguish the rare from the common items produced by Libbey, but with some study, you will. Marked pieces always sell at a premium in most items in the antique business, and this holds true of Libbey as well. Libbey’s marks are often very difficult to find, however. Should you come across some cut glass you’ve identified as having the quality of finer cut glass, be sure to take the time required to search for a signature, if there is one.

Damage to cut glass will reduced its value considerably, more than any other category of antique items. A flake, chip, or hairline crack will reduce its value by up to 90%. Even if a very valuable vase is ground to disguise a flake, the vase will drop in value significantly.

While finding any of Libbey’s higher end and more valuable items might not bring you as much as finding a 1940 Kentucky Derby Glass would, it could very easily add a few thousand dollars to your coffer. But don’t give up on discovering a Derby Glass. We found one a few days ago. Watch for it to be listed soon in the 31 Gallery & Marketplace.

I haven’t found that very special piece of Libbey cut glass yet, however I did find a small bowl once, marked for $25. Its sale for $500 was a big deal for me at that time in my life.

When you’re first starting out in the Antique & Fine Art Business, making $500 early seems like a very big deal, but later it might take making a profit of $5,000 to feel that same thrill. As you progress, it might be $50,000. This is why I have never tired of the Antique and Fine Art Business and I love it so much. My goal now is to find that special piece worth $500,000. Oh, it doesn’t matter if I find it just yet. Knowing that it’s out there waiting for me keeps me alert and ready to take on the day.

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Antique Business: Historic Events and Value

To be in the Antique and Fine Arts Business, history must hold some interest for you; enough interest to search out things from the past. Perhaps this business takes you back to those times or the events when the items you’ve discovered were produced, and this is an important connection in your life at some level. When I discover a great painting, I feel as if I knew the artist, because I am holding his work in my hands. Have you ever had that feeling?

 

The news coverage of this presidential election and the current news coverage of Hurricane Gustav has made me think about other events in our history. People’s memories are often short, but to the Collector of Historical Items, these events are forward in their mind and close to their heart. Those of us in this business have a deep appreciation for history, and this appreciation can help fatten our wallets and help to provide for our families by connecting those items we’ve found with a collector who is seeking them.

So what might be the historical events collectors seek items from?

On my local front, The Chicago Fire caused many stories to be created about its source. Did Mrs. O’Leary’s cow really kick over the lantern that set the whole city ablaze? If you come across items associated with this fire, there are many collectors who’d have great interest in this. How about events in your region of the country?

The Great San Francisco Earthquake is a great part of U.S. Western history. Even today, all the stories about future quakes are compared to that one. I am sure there are great pieces from this era that can only be found by looking in every old trunk you run across.

What could be more vividly etched in our minds than 9/11 or the assassination of President Kennedy? I can’t count the times I’ve heard people reciting exactly where they were when these events happened.

Remember the Martin Luther King letters I told you about? They were found by a friend of mine in a box lot at a local auction house who holds auctions twice a month. He bought them for next to nothing. It wouldn’t surprise me, if today, these letters could bring over $10,000.

How about the original copy of the Declaration of Independence that was found behind a two dollar print? At one time, an auction house estimated this to be worth over $3.5 million. Since that time, this document has been sold at auction, however, I don’t remember the exact hammer price. You can be certain is was quite substantial.

In our hunt for items from history, we should always remember that most of these items aren’t discovered out in the open. Rather, they’re hidden in trunks, basements, attics, behind cheap framed prints, or in scrapbooks or shoeboxes just waiting for us to uncover them. Even if they are out in the open, most eyes can’t recognize them, because many people who see them don’t have the knowledge of history necessary to know their value.

The story of a box of several dozen love letters written by a sailor during the Second World War brought great interest to me recently. The article seemed to infer that these letters would have significant historical value, and therefore, dollar value. Why did this interest me? Because the day I saw that story, we had just purchased 147 letters from a Confederate Soldier written to his wife. If the first letters, written sixty years ago, were considered valuable, how about letters written 160 years ago during the Civil War – one of the most significant events in this country’s history?

Only so many Tiffany Glass pieces or Rookwood Pottery items were produced, but the number of items that have historical content are unlimited. This gives us a great opportunity each day to find one of these treasures, if we’ll only look.

I am sure that you can think of many more events from the past as well as the people associated with them, either nationally or local to your area. If these events mean something to you, they might also have importance to others. And they might hold some surprise value when a Collector wants to buy it from you. Who knows? A Historical Society or Museum might even be interested.

If you have found anything of historical significance, please send me an email describing it and I will share it with the rest of our members.

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Carnival Glass: Stay Current with Trends

Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club

Building Personal Wealth Trading Antiques, Fine Art, & Collectibles

For some time, I’ve told you how very important it is to stay current with the trends so you won’t make mistakes. Well, I guess I will have to take some of my own medicine, because I am surprised how far off I was on the trend in rare Carnival Glass.

Some of the Carnival Glass I sold only two or three years ago have tripled or more in value since then. I was talking to Cecil about the Carnival Glass Blue People’s Vase that brought in over $31,000 and he began to laugh. At first I wanted to punch him because I thought he didn’t believe me. But, that wasn’t the case. He showed me that in the latest Mordini Records on Carnival Glass, this piece sold for over $100,000. If Carnival Glass in of interest to you, you can get the Mordini Records for a very reasonable amount each year.

At this point, I have to admit my curiosity got the best of me, and I had to know what some other pieces I sold were worth today. According to the records, a plate I sold for $5000 sold for over $17,000 and a punch set that brought me $4500 listed near $20,000. I wanted to quit looking.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not sorry I sold these pieces. After all, the profits were quickly reinvested and I’ve kept my money moving and compounding. I was more upset I haven’t kept current on their prices. You see, if I passed a great piece because I wasn’t prepared by staying current on prices, this could have been my misfortune.

You can be assured that Rare Carnival Glass will be added to the What’s Hot List, and I’ve learned a lesson. But remember, not all Carnival Glass is desirable. Look for pastel colors and unusual pieces. Vintage pieces in red will definitely make you a happy camper if you come across them.

Today’s Photo: A rare Fenton 3-Toed Bowl in Grape & Cable Pattern. This bowl is in the Showroom and Museum of Replacement’s, Ltd.

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Antique Painted Chests and Other Painted Furniture. Does the Paint Have Value?

Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club Blog

 

Learn to Build Up Your Personal Finances Trading Antiques, Fine Art & Collectibles at the 31 Club.

 

19th Century Cupboard with old blue paint is offered at Hillsdale Barn Antiques for $2,250

Some of you have heard this story before, but repetition reinforces something in your mind. So for those of you who have already heard the story, it’s a good idea to read it again.

A participant on the Antique Road Show brought a highboy dresser to be appraised. He told the appraiser that when he purchased it, it had been covered in horrible red paint that covered the beautiful grain of the wood, so he had it restored. He gave the highest praises to the restorer.

The Antique Road Show appraiser asked him, “Which would you like first, the good news or the bad news? The man chose the good news first, and that good news was that it was a wonderful piece with no repairs or added pieces. The appraiser told him it was worth about $35,000. “But the bad news is that you washed $100,000 of red paint off of it.”

 This story brings me to what I want to discuss today; antique painted items, like boxes, trunks, chests, tables and more. If these painted items are genuine, they can bring big bucks.

 

 How do you know painted antique items are genuine?

 

For starters, their paint shouldn’t look like it was painted yesterday. Something that’s over a hundred years old should look its age, and have a very mellow patina.

Next, I’ll often ask the person who owns the piece if the items has any history. I’ve often been told the whole story of where it came from and who owned it. Don’t let this be your only means for evaluating an item though, because sometimes the story doesn’t match the piece you’re looking at. When you go to antique shows and antique shops, you can examine the real thing and this will prepare you for when that special piece is offered to you.

As you research the patterns that were used during certain time periods on painted items, they’ll become familiar to you. That way, when you see them, bingo! You might have just rung the cash register, and we aren’t talking small bucks here, but very possibly some extremely green money.

A recent example of what I’m talking about showed up at Cowan’s Auction last March 15th. There were several nice painted pieces in the catalog, and one was a nice 19th century Bentwood box that had an estimate of $500 to $800. Another was a box painted with flowers estimated at $700 to $1000. Next came the Pennsylvania Dower chest estimated at $6000 to $9000, and what a beauty it was.

Be sure you examine all painted items, large or small, because if they are from the 18th or 19th century they have true value. While some dealers will just pass them by as being new, with your keen eye, you will pluck them right out of a pile of trash.

Put a Turbo Charge on your Antique & Collectible Treasure Hunting Skills. Join Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club.


Get FREE MENTORING in the Antique and Fine Art Business. Learn Inside the Industry Secrets that help you increase your profits. Then Learn to Grow Your Money Exponentially Buying and Selling only Antiques, Fine Art, and Collectibles with Daryle’s Strategic Business Plan. Our Members are Newbies to Seasoned Dealers, making more money than they thought possible. Join Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club, today.

 

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Tired of the Stock Market Roller Coaster? Fine Art & Antiques Market is Still Sizzling

Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club Blog

Learning to Build Personal Wealth Trading in Antiques, Fine Art, & Collectibles


One day the stock market is up 150 points, the next it’s down over 200. Over and over again. Are you beginning to grow weary of this roller coaster market? You might even be thinking about exiting the market, where do you go?

The 31 Club’s answer to the roller coaster stock market is to invest some of your money in Antiques, Fine Art and Collectibles. When things are the bleakest for other markets, the Antique, Fine Art and Collectible markets shine.

In this troubled market, it still amazes me when people are able to buy items for a small amount of money and then resell them immediately for many, many times their purchase price. I encourage all who will listen to me to maximize their efforts by investing their money in inventory that can be turned quickly today. I believe we have reached the optimum time to accelerate our efforts to follow the guidelines set out in my book 31 Steps to Your Millions in Antiques and Collectibles. Regardless of what other markets are doing, we can still profit quite handsomely using the tangible items being bought and sold in a sizzling high end antique, fine art and collectible market like we have today, then following the strategy to grow funds presented in my book. There isn’t a better time to be trading in items that hold their value and appreciate in all types of economic situations.

“Make Hay While the Sun is Shining” is an old saying I take to heart. And, the auctions, estate sales and garage sale markets are in full bloom now, so are you spending the proper amount of time visiting them to fully take advantage of these conditions?

This is the time to encourage people you know to purchase quality Antiques and Paintings and offer your expertise in the field to assure them of investing properly. I was able to assist one of our members in purchasing several pieces of Lotton Glass a few months ago, and today, she could double her money if she wished to sell them. This is at a time when the stock market has lost 4000 points.

I simply love this business. One reason is because it helps insure us against financial setbacks. You carry home insurance, car insurance and life insurance but what kind of insurance can we have in the business? Yes, there is insurance against breakage or other forms of damage to our items, but that doesn’t insure that what we buy will make us profit. But there is a form of insurance we control that costs us nothing: The price you pay for your inventory. When there is a cloud of fear overhanging the financial condition of most people, you just offer less for the items you wish to purchase. Yes, the percentage of items that you buy may shrink, but you will have received insurance at the lower cost to assure your profitability on the items you sell.

An example of this might be that painting that you would have offered $500 for 6 months ago. Today your offer might be $350. Or that Tiffany vase that would’ve caught your attention at a price of $1000, might cause you to want to make that offer today at only $800. This is insurance that you control, and you receive it at no cost. You can’t beat that.

My time in the Smoky Mountains is quickly coming to an end, but I have to admit, I miss all your phone calls and emails. I want to get back to work so I can enjoy all those stories of your successes. I truly do feel that we are forming a community that has the core values I wrote about two days ago: God, Family and Country.

Put a Turbo Charge on your Antique & Collectible Treasure Hunting Skills. Join Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club.

Get FREE MENTORING. Learn Inside the Industry Secrets that help you increase your profits. Then Learn to Grow Your Money Exponentially Buying and Selling only Antiques, Fine Art, and Collectibles with Daryle’s Strategic Business Plan. Our Members are Newbies to Seasoned Dealers, making more money than they thought possible. Join Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club, today.

My 220 page book, 31 Steps to Your Millions in Antiques & Collectibles is FREE with your membership. Join Today!

Check out the new Paintings and new items in our Gallery and Marketplace here.

Vintage Clothing & Accessories as a Business

Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club Blog

          Learning to Build Wealth Trading in Antiques, Fine Art & Collectibles

This Vintage Hermes 35″ x 35″ Silk Scarf sold on eBay for $250 in June, 2008.

Today as a favor for my friend, Colin, who is sharing our vacation, I attended a meeting on timeshares so that he could receive a $75 gift. This seemed simple enough, but as most things in my life it took a strange turn. When I joined him, the session was already in progress, and the young lady who was conducting the interview looked to be eighteen or nineteen years old. This proved to be the fact, because she was a recent high school graduate. Her name was Ana, and I was amazed at her command of the financial facts necessary to sell a timeshare.

Colin was more than willing for me to enter into their conversation, and I soon learned that her father was an Elvis Presley impersonator here in Pigeon Forge. What a life this young lady has lived, but I will have to share more of it with you later. I asked her if she got her poise from her father, and the answer was “yes”. I soon shared with her about the 31 Club, and this started an extended conversation.

You see, at this early age, she is already planning her future and it includes a Vintage Clothing store and this extended to a large Internet presence. Having my total attention now, she began to mentor me in the field of Vintage Clothing and Accessories. Did you know that the real market in this field is in the accessories, and the profit can be fit for a King? A vintage scarf that puts the finishing touches on the special outfit may sell for $250, or the belt that accentuates that wonderful waist line can fetch up to $500. Boy, am I behind the times! When you add hats, gloves, shoes and jewelry to this mix you have the opportunity to enlarge your bank account fairly rapidly. I ask her if the market in Vintage Clothing and Accessories could support her in the lifestyle that she wanted to live in the future. Her answer was “it could provide me with any lifestyle that I could dream of.” How often have you passed by the clothing and accessories lying in the bedroom of your last visit to a house sale?

I promise, as soon as I return to Chicago, I will be hitting the books to get myself up to par on this field of collectibles. I hope that you will too. Ana has promised to stay in touch, and as continues to coach me, I will help her get her company off he ground. Colin and I have already learned that she is going to be in Chicago soon, and we’ll get together then.

Almost everyday, I run into people that have great ideas that pertain to the field of collecting. I hope that I will be able to pass these on to our members so that the horizons in collectibles will be widened. Who would have ever thought that those old garments and accessories that my mother was throwing out today could be worth a fortune? We always get back to those tried and true sayings like “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.” So true, so true.
Put a Turbo Charge on your Antique & Collectible Treasure Hunting Skills. Join Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club.

Get FREE MENTORING. Learn Inside the Industry Secrets that help you increase your profits. Then Learn to Grow Your Money Exponentially Buying and Selling only Antiques, Fine Art, and Collectibles with Daryle’s Strategic Business Plan. Our Members are Newbies to Seasoned Dealers, making more money than they thought possible. Join Daryle Lambert’s 31 Club, today.

My 220 page book, 31 Steps to Your Millions in Antiques & Collectibles is FREE with your membership. Join Today!

Check out the new Paintings and new items in our Gallery and Marketplace here